Recent posts

  • Type: FAQ
    Post date: Jun 24th 2019
    Body:

    FAQ: H-1B joining another employer while a transfer,

    extension or amendment is pending

    Video Transcript

    1. The answer is yes. 

    2. It depends. Normally 60 days grace period is available for unexpected cessation of employment. As long as your I-94 is valid. But let's say your I-94 is valid for only 45 days you will not get a 60 day grace period. You will get a 45 day grace period. More...

     

    Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

  • Type: FAQ
    Post date: Jun 24th 2019
    Body:

    Watch the Video on this FAQ:

    Impact on current H-1B if another H-1B is denied

    Video Transcript

    1. No, not if you are maintaining status. 

    2. If the case was denied just for maintenance of status and you have the pay stubs that are required then there is a very high likelihood the case will be reopened. If the petition is denied, then you are still subject to the H-1B quota. More...

     

    Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

  • Type: Audio and Video
    Post date: Jun 21st 2019
    Body:
  • Type: News
    Post date: Jun 20th 2019
    Body:

    Rajiv S Khanna, Managing Attorney at Immigraiton.com told TOI: “Changes like imposing per country limits on H-1B visas will most likely require a legislative mandate, which can only be secured through amendment of laws passed by both Houses of the Congress (US Parliament). It is highly unlikely that a provision like this will make it through the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives. Neither visa extensions nor new H-1B visas can be affected in such a profound manner through an executive order or action without legislative mandate. As far as I can see, such an executive action would be wide open to a judicial review and strike down.”

    “Further, under the US laws, most changes even in long-standing policy would require formal rule making, which is a lengthy process unless there are emergent reasons. Even in emergencies rule making can take a year or more, especially if you factor in the very high likelihood of a judicial challenge,” Khanna concluded.

    For more on this news please read the attached file. 

  • Type: PERM PROCESSING DATES
    Post date: Jun 20th 2019
    Body:
    Processing Queue Priority Dates
    Month Year
    Analyst Review April 2019
    Audit Review November 2018
    Reconsideration Requests to the CO February 2019

    The Analyst Review and Audit dates posted on iCERT above reflect the month and year in which cases were filed that are now being adjudicated at the Atlanta National Processing Center. *The Reconsideration Request to the CO dates posted on iCERT above reflect the month and year in which cases that are now being reviewed at the Atlanta National Processing Center were appealed. For various reasons, the center may be completing the processing of applications filed prior to the month posted on iCERT. If your application was filed more than 3 months prior to the month posted, you may contact  Helpdesk for a status on the application at plc.atlanta@dol.gov.

    Determinations Average Number of Days to Process PERM Applications
    Month Calendar Days
    Analyst Review May 2019 71
    Audit Review May 2019 222

    The Analyst Review and Audit Review determination processing times on iCERT above reflect the amount of time to process applications for the month. The actual processing time for each employer PERM application may vary from the average depending on the material facts and circumstances. OFLC is only reporting the average processing time for all PERM applications for the most recent month.